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Non-contact AFM: A Chemical Reaction Caught in the Act
Jun. 04, 2013

Non-contact AFM: A Chemical Reaction Caught in the Act

When Felix Fischer of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) set out to develop nanostructures made of graphene using a new, controlled approach to chemical reactions, the first result was a surprise: spectacular images of individual carbon atoms and the bonds between them.
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Asylum Research Announces Ben Ohler as AFM Business Manager
Jun. 03, 2013

Asylum Research Announces Ben Ohler as AFM Business Manager

Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments company, announces the appointment of Dr. Ben Ohler to the new position of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Business Manager. Ohler will oversee the Asylum MFP-3D family of products as well as manage the strategic direction, new product development, and product marketing for the entire line.

More information:
http://www.asylumresearch.com/ more
Photonic Industry on the Upswing
Jun. 03, 2013

Photonic Industry on the Upswing

The global  photonics industry gathered at the Laser World of Photonics and Europe's largest Photonics Congress, the World of Photonics Congress, in Munich from 13 to 16 May 2013. The bottom line: more exhibitors than ever before, visitor numbers stable at a high level, a high number of product premieres and an insight into revolutionary technologies, such as 3D printing, digital photonic production, medical technology or biophotonics.
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A New Type of Laser
May. 24, 2013

A New Type of Laser

University of Würzburg physicists have succeeded in creating a new type of laser. Its operation principle is completely different from conventional devices, which opens up the possibility of a significantly reduced energy input requirement. The researchers report their work in Nature.
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Heinrich Rohrer, the Co-inventor of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope, Passed Away
May. 23, 2013

Heinrich Rohrer, the Co-inventor of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope, Passed Away

The co-inventor of the scanning tunneling microscope, Dr. Heinrich Rohrer, passed away on the evening of May 16, 2013. He was 79. Heinrich Rohrer, IBM Fellow and Nobel Laureate, joined the IBM Research Laboratory in Zurich, Switzerland, in December of 1963, where he worked for 34 years. After hiring a young scientist named Gerd Binnig in the late 1970s, the two started collaborating, brought closely together by their backgrounds in superconductivity and their fascination with atomic surfaces. The two scientists grew increasingly frustrated by the limits of the tools then available to study the distinct characteristics of atomic surfaces, so they decided to build their own, something that would be capable of seeing and manipulating atoms at the nanoscale level.
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Improved Imaging Technique Solve Key Puzzle of LED Efficiency
May. 23, 2013

Improved Imaging Technique Solve Key Puzzle of LED Efficiency

From the high-resolution glow of flat screen televisions to light bulbs that last for years, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) continue to transform technology. The celebrated efficiency and versatility of LEDs-and other solid-state technologies including laser diodes and solar photovoltaics-make them increasingly popular. Their full potential, however, remains untapped, in part because the semiconductor alloys that make these devices work continue to puzzle scientists.
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Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: Measuring Oxygen Consumption of Individual Cells
May. 14, 2013

Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy: Measuring Oxygen Consumption of Individual Cells

How active a living cell is can be seen by its oxygen consumption. The method for determining this consumption has now been significantly improved by chemists in Bochum. The problem up to now was that the measuring electrode altered the oxygen consumption in the cell's environment much more than the cell itself. "We already found that out twelve years ago," says Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schuhmann from the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the Ruhr-Universität (Germany). "Now we have finally managed to make the measuring electrode an spectator." Together with his team, he reports in the "International Edition" of the journal Angewandte Chemie.
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May. 13, 2013

X-ray Free-electron Lasers: Observing the Movement of Electrons around Atoms

X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) produce higher-power laser pulses over a broader range of energies compared with most other x-ray sources. Although the pulse durations currently available are enormously useful for the study of materials, even shorter pulses are needed to observe features such as electrons at subatomic scales. Takashi Tanaka from the Riken SPring-8 Center has now proposed a theoretical pulse-amplification scheme that allows for the production of ultrashort x-ray pulses at extremely high energies.
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