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Jul. 19, 2013

Zeiss Completes Acquisition of Xradia

Zeiss today announced that the acquisition of U.S.-based Xradia, Inc. has been completed.
The acquisition agreement was first announced on June 13 and the transaction closed and became effective on July 12. more
ESTEM: Imaging Individual Atoms in a Living Catalytic Reaction
Jul. 18, 2013

ESTEM: Imaging Individual Atoms in a Living Catalytic Reaction

A new electron microscopy technology developed at the University of York is allowing researchers to observe and analyse single atoms, small clusters and nanoparticles in dynamic in-situ experiments for the first time. The work being carried out at York is opening up striking new opportunities for observing and understanding the role of atoms in reactions in many areas of the physical sciences. It also has important implications for new medicines and new energy sources.
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Random Lasers Can Be Accurately Controlled
Jul. 17, 2013

Random Lasers Can Be Accurately Controlled

Random Lasers are tiny structures emitting light irregularly into different directions. Scientists at the Vienna University of Technology have now shown that these exotic light sources can be accurately controlled. The light they emit is as unique as a fingerprint: random lasers are tiny devices with a light emission pattern governed by random scattering of light. Understanding the underlying details of random lasing action has only been achieved recently. Now the scientists have presented a method to steer the radiation emitted by a random laser into a pre-determined direction. What has started out as a curious idea now has the potential to become a useful new type of light source.
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Electron Spectroscopy: Not just Snapshots, Real Movies
Jul. 16, 2013

Electron Spectroscopy: Not just Snapshots, Real Movies

Electrons are no slouches. In fact, they move so fast that they are hard to pin down. Nowadays these elementary particles can indeed be imaged, but what one gets are single, isolated snapshots. So the dispersion of free electrons over time has so far been impossible to observe directly. But now research groups based at LMU's Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP) and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Garching, in collaboration with colleagues at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena have come up with a laser configuration that will make it possible to follow the dynamics of electrons essentially by filming them.
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Super-Resolution Microscopy: Solving the Structure of the Nuclear Pore
Jul. 16, 2013

Super-Resolution Microscopy: Solving the Structure of the Nuclear Pore

In a study published online in Science, scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany used super-resolution microscopy to solve a decade-long debate about the structure of the nuclear pore complex, which controls access to the genome by acting as a gate into the cell's nucleus.
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Building a New Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope for Studying Basic Geochemical Problems
Jul. 06, 2013

Building a New Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope for Studying Basic Geochemical Problems

A high-power atomic force microscope that could revolutionize the study of materials at high temperatures and pressures is coming into focus in a Wright State University lab. Steven Higgins and his team are building a new version of the hydrothermal atomic force microscope, an instrument that could unlock scientific mysteries and be used in the study of oil production, hydrofracturing of rock layers, storage of radioactive waste and the capture and storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide. more
Through-Focus Scanning Optical Microscopy: Helping Computer Industry Develop Nanoscale 3D Components
Jul. 05, 2013

Through-Focus Scanning Optical Microscopy: Helping Computer Industry Develop Nanoscale 3D Components

A technique developed several years ago at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for improving optical microscopes now has been applied to monitoring the next generation of computer chip circuit components, potentially providing the semiconductor industry with a crucial tool for improving chips for the next decade or more.
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Neuroscience: Problem-Solving Governs How We Process Sensory Stimuli
Jul. 04, 2013

Neuroscience: Problem-Solving Governs How We Process Sensory Stimuli

Monitoring neuronal activity using two-photon calcium imaging: Various areas of the brain process our sensory experiences. How the areas of the cerebral cortex communicate with each other and process sensory information has long puzzled neuroscientists. Exploring the sense of touch in mice, brain researchers from the University of Zurich now demonstrate that the transmission of sensory information from one cortical area to connected areas depends on the specific task to solve and the goal-directed behavior. These findings can serve as a basis for an improved understanding of cognitive disorders. more
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