You are here: HomeNews Overview › Archive

News Overview

3D Dynamic Imaging of Soft Materials
Oct. 08, 2013

3D Dynamic Imaging of Soft Materials

Through a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their own unique graphene liquid cell, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have recorded the three-dimensional motion of DNA connected to gold nanocrystals (see movie). This is the first time TEM has been used for 3D dynamic imaging of so-called soft materials. The results were published in the journal Nano Letters.
more
New X-Ray Micro Tomography Method Can Reveal Internal Structure of Objects
Oct. 08, 2013

New X-Ray Micro Tomography Method Can Reveal Internal Structure of Objects

University of Manchester researchers, working with colleagues in the UK, Europe and the US, say the novel imaging technique could have a wide range of applications across many disciplines, such as materials science, geology, environmental science and medical research. "This new imaging method - termed Pair Distribution Function-Computed Tomography - represents one of the most significant developments in X-ray micro tomography for almost 30 years," said Professor Robert Cernik in Manchester's School of Materials. "Using this method we are able to image objects in a non-invasive manner to reveal their physical and chemical nano-properties and relate these to their distribution in three-dimensional space at the micron scale."
more
New Microscope: Using Neutrons to Create High-Resolution Images
Oct. 07, 2013

New Microscope: Using Neutrons to Create High-Resolution Images

Researchers at MIT, working with partners at NASA, have developed a new concept for a microscope that would use neutrons - subatomic particles with no electrical charge - instead of beams of light or electrons to create high-resolution images. Among other features, neutron-based instruments have the ability to probe inside metal objects - such as fuel cells, batteries, and engines, even when in use - to learn details of their internal structure. Neutron instruments are also uniquely sensitive to magnetic properties and to lighter elements that are important in biological materials. The new concept has been outlined in a series of research papers this year, including one published this week in Nature Communications.
more
The World's Sharpest X-Ray Beam
Oct. 01, 2013

The World's Sharpest X-Ray Beam

The world's sharpest X-ray beam shines at DESY. At the X-ray light source PETRA III, scientists from Göttingen generated a beam with a diameter of barely 5 nanometres - this is ten thousand times thinner than human hair. This fine beam of X-ray light allows focusing on smallest details. The research groups of Professor Tim Salditt from the Institute of X-ray Physics and of Professor Hans-Ulrich Krebs from the Institute of Materials Physics of the University of Göttingen published their work in the research journal Optics Express.
more
Single Molecule Community Met at PicoQuant's Annual Workshop
Oct. 01, 2013

Single Molecule Community Met at PicoQuant's Annual Workshop

From September 4 to 6 more than 100 international researchers gathered at PicoQuant's annual workshop on "Single Molecule Spectroscopy and Ultrasensitive Analysis in the Life Sciences" in the German capital city of Berlin. The participants enjoyed 37 highly up-to-date talks, including nine lectures given by renowned invited speakers, and two poster sessions with a total of 36 posters. A reception and a dinner gave attendees additional opportunities to discuss latest results, projects and ideas.
more
Sep. 27, 2013

Atomic Force Microscopy: Real-time Observations of Lithium–oxygen Electrochemical Reactions

Lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries are a new type of experimental battery that electric car manufacturers are hoping will address the issue of limited driving range. Unlike the lithium-ion batteries used today, lithium-oxygen batteries do not require metal oxide cathodes to produce electrochemical power, instead generating power from reactions with oxygen in the atmosphere. The significant weight savings realized through this design could potentially boost energy densities of batteries by up to four times. However, lithium-oxygen batteries have yet to leave the laboratory due to short battery lifespans caused by parasitic side reactions and accumulated charge polarization at battery cathodes.
more
Sep. 26, 2013

Edmund Optics 2013 Higher Education Award

Edmund Optics (EO), a provider of optical components to both industry and academia, announced the winners of its 2013 Higher Education Global Grant Program. This award is given in recognition of outstanding undergraduate and graduate optics programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics at non-profit colleges and universities worldwide. Over US-$ 85,000 in EO products will be awarded to the first-, second-, and third-place winners in the Americas, Asia, and Europe, in support of their research and education activities.
more
Measuring Neuronal Activity Using High-resolution Scanning Probe Microscopy
Sep. 25, 2013

Measuring Neuronal Activity Using High-resolution Scanning Probe Microscopy

A new technique that allows scientists to measure the electrical activity in the communication junctions of the nervous systems has been developed by a researcher at Queen Mary University of London. The junctions in the central nervous systems that enable the information to flow between neurons, known as synapses, are around 100 times smaller than the width of a human hair (one micrometer and less) and as such are difficult to target let alone measure. By applying a high-resolution scanning probe microscopy that allows three-dimensional visualization of the structures, the team were able to measure and record the flow of current in small synaptic terminals for the first time.
more
RSS Newsletter