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Fluorescence Microscopy: Tracking Viral DNA in the Cell
Oct. 17, 2013

Fluorescence Microscopy: Tracking Viral DNA in the Cell

Cell biologists and chemists from the University of Zurich reveal how viral DNA traffics in human cells. They have developed a new method to generate virus particles containing labeled viral DNA genomes. This allowed them to visualize, for the first time, single viral genomes in the cytoplasm and the nucleus by using fluorescence microscopy in regular or super-resolution mode. The new findings enhance our understanding of how viral disease occurs, and how cells respond to infections. The results were published in the journal Cell Host Microbe.
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Symposium on Confocal Raman Imaging
Oct. 17, 2013

Symposium on Confocal Raman Imaging

This year WITec, manufacturer of Raman microscopy technology, celebrated the 10th anniversary of their confocal Raman imaging symposium in Ulm, the German city where the company's headquarters is also located. Hosted at the Stadthaus in the city centre next to its famous cathedral, the three-day-conference - September 30 to October 2 - was attended by over 110 international participants. Besides 16 lectures and 21 poster contributions, a broad range of Raman imaging applications and technology aspects were presented to the audience. The last day of the Symposium was reserved for equipment demonstrations given at the company's headquarters.
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Oct. 10, 2013

Newport and REO Partner on HeNe Lasers

REO has named Newport as the exclusive global sales partner for their extensive range of Helium-Neon lasers. Specifically, this product line includes HeNe's with red, green, yellow and infrared output, as well as a single frequency, stabilized HeNe that operates at 633 nm. Under the terms of this agreement, which became effective July 1, 2013, Newport will inventory all REO HeNe products, and handle all sales and technical support for new customers through its global sales team.
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Imaging Cells through a Silicon Wafer by Adapting Quantitative Phase Imaging
Oct. 09, 2013

Imaging Cells through a Silicon Wafer by Adapting Quantitative Phase Imaging

Scientists at MIT and the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) have developed a new type of microscopy that can image cells through a silicon wafer, allowing them to precisely measure the size and mechanical behavior of cells behind the wafer. The new technology, which relies on near-infrared light, could help scientists learn more about diseased or infected cells as they flow through silicon microfluidic devices. A paper describing the technology has been published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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3D Dynamic Imaging of Soft Materials
Oct. 08, 2013

3D Dynamic Imaging of Soft Materials

Through a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and their own unique graphene liquid cell, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have recorded the three-dimensional motion of DNA connected to gold nanocrystals (see movie). This is the first time TEM has been used for 3D dynamic imaging of so-called soft materials. The results were published in the journal Nano Letters.
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New X-Ray Micro Tomography Method Can Reveal Internal Structure of Objects
Oct. 08, 2013

New X-Ray Micro Tomography Method Can Reveal Internal Structure of Objects

University of Manchester researchers, working with colleagues in the UK, Europe and the US, say the novel imaging technique could have a wide range of applications across many disciplines, such as materials science, geology, environmental science and medical research. "This new imaging method - termed Pair Distribution Function-Computed Tomography - represents one of the most significant developments in X-ray micro tomography for almost 30 years," said Professor Robert Cernik in Manchester's School of Materials. "Using this method we are able to image objects in a non-invasive manner to reveal their physical and chemical nano-properties and relate these to their distribution in three-dimensional space at the micron scale."
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New Microscope: Using Neutrons to Create High-Resolution Images
Oct. 07, 2013

New Microscope: Using Neutrons to Create High-Resolution Images

Researchers at MIT, working with partners at NASA, have developed a new concept for a microscope that would use neutrons - subatomic particles with no electrical charge - instead of beams of light or electrons to create high-resolution images. Among other features, neutron-based instruments have the ability to probe inside metal objects - such as fuel cells, batteries, and engines, even when in use - to learn details of their internal structure. Neutron instruments are also uniquely sensitive to magnetic properties and to lighter elements that are important in biological materials. The new concept has been outlined in a series of research papers this year, including one published this week in Nature Communications.
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The World's Sharpest X-Ray Beam
Oct. 01, 2013

The World's Sharpest X-Ray Beam

The world's sharpest X-ray beam shines at DESY. At the X-ray light source PETRA III, scientists from Göttingen generated a beam with a diameter of barely 5 nanometres - this is ten thousand times thinner than human hair. This fine beam of X-ray light allows focusing on smallest details. The research groups of Professor Tim Salditt from the Institute of X-ray Physics and of Professor Hans-Ulrich Krebs from the Institute of Materials Physics of the University of Göttingen published their work in the research journal Optics Express.
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