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Using Lasers and Carbon Nanotubes to Look inside Living Brains
Aug. 13, 2014

Using Lasers and Carbon Nanotubes to Look inside Living Brains

A team of Stanford scientists has developed an entirely non-invasive technique that provides a view of blood flow in the brain. The tool could provide powerful insights into strokes and possibly Alzheimer's disease. Results have been published in Nature Photonics.
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Photoacoustic Microscopy: New Hand-Held Device for Deeper Melanoma Imaging
Aug. 12, 2014

Photoacoustic Microscopy: New Hand-Held Device for Deeper Melanoma Imaging

Photoacoustic Microscopy: A new hand-held device that uses lasers and sound waves may change the way doctors treat and diagnose melanoma, according to a team of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis. The instrument, described in a paper published in The Optical Society's (OSA) journal Optics Letters, is the first that can be used directly on a patient and accurately measure how deep a melanoma tumor extends into the skin, providing valuable information for treatment, diagnosis or prognosis.
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Labeling & Nanoscopy Conference
Aug. 11, 2014

Labeling & Nanoscopy Conference

The conference Labeling & Nanoscopy will take place from 24-26 September 2014 in Heidelberg, Germany. This conference brings together experts in fluorescence and labeling with those designing and applying new concepts of far-field optical nanoscopy.
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Jul. 31, 2014

Bruker Announces Acquisition of High-Speed, 3D Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy Company ...

Bruker announced that it has acquired Vutara, a provider of high-speed, three-dimensional (3D), super-resolution fluorescence microscopy for life science applications. Transaction details were not disclosed. Vutara's estimated revenue for the full year 2014 is expected to be approximately $-US 2 million.
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Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Revealing New Characteristics of Complex Oxide Surfaces
Jul. 29, 2014

Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: Revealing New Characteristics of Complex Oxide Surfaces

A novel combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties. The research team led by ORNL's Zheng Gai examined how oxygen affects the surface of a perovskite manganite, a complex material that exhibits dramatic magnetic and electronic behavior. The new avenue to understand surface behavior could benefit researchers who are interested in using a wide range of correlated oxide materials for applications such as solid fuel cells or oxygen sensors.
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Medical Imaging: New Imaging Agent Provides Better Picture of the Gut
Jul. 28, 2014

Medical Imaging: New Imaging Agent Provides Better Picture of the Gut

A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This safe, noninvasive method for assessing the function and properties of the GI tract in real time could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of gut diseases. Results have been published online in Nature Nanotechnology.
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Imaging Polarization Charges Using Charge Gradient Microscopy
Jul. 24, 2014

Imaging Polarization Charges Using Charge Gradient Microscopy

Polarization charges in ferroelectric materials are screened by equal amounts of surface charges with opposite polarity under ambient conditions. Researchers from the Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne's Nanoscience & Technology and Materials Science divisions, and Tohoku University have shown that scraping, collecting, and quantifying surface screen charges reveals the underlying polarization domain structure at high speed, a technique dubbed charge gradient microscopy (CGM).
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Reconstructing an Animal’s Development Cell by Cell
Jul. 23, 2014

Reconstructing an Animal’s Development Cell by Cell

Advances in imaging technology are transforming how scientists see the cellular universe, showing the form and movement of once grainy and blurred structures in stunning detail. But extracting the torrent of information contained in those images often surpasses the limits of existing computational and data analysis techniques, leaving scientists less than satisfied.
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