You are here: HomeNews Overview › Archive

News Overview

Traumatic Brain Injury
Mar. 19, 2014

Traumatic Brain Injury

Even the mildest form of a traumatic brain injury, better known as a concussion, can deal permanent, irreparable damage. Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania is using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in this kind of injury, with an eye toward protecting the brain from its long-term consequences. more
Trends in Microscopy 2014
Mar. 11, 2014

Trends in Microscopy 2014

The conference "Trends in Micoscopy 2014" will take place from March 27 -29 in Freiburg, Germany. The conference brings together leading high-end microscope techniques developers and users from Germany with their world-wide colleagues.

Main Topics: more
Pulling Polymers with a Tip of an Atomic Force Microscope
Mar. 10, 2014

Pulling Polymers with a Tip of an Atomic Force Microscope

In collaboration with colleagues from Berlin and Madrid, researchers at the Department of Physics at the University of Basel have pulled up isolated molecular chains from a gold surface, using the tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The observed signal provides insight into the detachment force and binding energy of molecules. The results have been published in the journal PNAS.
more
6th Course on Time-Resolved Microscopy and Correlation Spectroscopy
Mar. 07, 2014

6th Course on Time-Resolved Microscopy and Correlation Spectroscopy

For the sixth time now, PicoQuant has organized the European Short Course on "Time-resolved Microscopy and Correlation Spectroscopy", held in Berlin, Germany from February 25 to 27, 2014. The line-up of six leading experts gave an introduction into the basics of time-resolved fluorescence microscopy and also presented their latest research results to the 48 participants from all around the world. In the afternoons, practical sessions gave the participants the opportunity to use the cutting-edge equipment.
more
Mar. 06, 2014

Attocube Systems Acquires the Majority Holding in Neaspec

Munich-based nanotechnology specialist attocube took over the majority share in Neaspec by mid-February. Neaspec - a company based in Martinsried close to Munich - specializes in developing scanning near-field optical microscopes (SNOM).
more
Win an iPad with your Best AFM Images
Mar. 06, 2014

Win an iPad with your Best AFM Images

Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments company, invites all Cypher and MFP-3D AFM users to enter their best AFM data, including images, force curves, or videos, in the Asylum Research Image Contest. Each scientist will receive an Asylum gift pack just for sending in their images. An Apple iPad will be awarded at the close of each quarter to the winning image that best represents excellence in science and the "cool" factor as judged by our team of applications scientists. Select entries will also be featured in the Asylum Research website gallery.
more
Nanoscale Freezing Leads to Better Imaging
Mar. 05, 2014

Nanoscale Freezing Leads to Better Imaging

It's an odd twist. For scientists to determine if a cell is functioning properly, they must destroy it. This is what happens in X-ray fluorescence microscopy when biological specimens are exposed to ionizing radiation, which provides images with a level of detail that conventional microscopes just can't match. This exposure can change what is being imaged in profound ways, possibly giving false accounts of how the cell actually works. To address this issue, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory created a new probe that freezes cells to "see" at greater detail without damaging the sample.
more
Imaging Living Cancer Cells with Scanning X-Ray Nanodiffraction
Mar. 04, 2014

Imaging Living Cancer Cells with Scanning X-Ray Nanodiffraction

Göttingen-based scientists working at DESY's PETRA III research light source have carried out the first studies of living biological cells using high-energy X-rays. The new method shows clear differences in the internal cellular structure between living and dead, chemically fixed cells that are often analysed. "The new method for the first time enables us to investigate the internal structures of living cells in their natural environment using hard X-rays," emphasises the leader of the working group, Prof. Sarah Köster from the Institute for X-Ray Physics of the University of Göttingen. The researchers present their work in the journal Physical Review Letters.
more
RSS Newsletter