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Nov. 17, 2014

Imaging Companies in Europe Get Closer to Life Scientists

Leading imaging companies Leica, Nikon, Zeiss, FEI, Olympus, SVI and Photometrics announced that for the first time they jointly founded an open Industry Board linked to the upcoming European research infrastructure for imaging "Euro-BioImaging". The mission of the Board is to facilitate interaction between imaging industry and its academic users, enabling timely understanding of the users' needs. This has potential to directly boost innovation in biomedical sciences and strengthen the position of companies which can respond faster to new developments on the market.
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Developing a New Type of X-Ray Lens
Nov. 13, 2014

Developing a New Type of X-Ray Lens

Researchers have taken an important step towards developing a new X-ray lens made of diamond. A team of scientists from the Technische Universität (TU) Dresden and Technische Universität Chemnitz as well as from DESY have successfully tested a new lens design. The group working with DESY Leading Scientist, Professor Christian Schroer, presents the results in the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters.
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New Book: Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Imaging
Nov. 12, 2014

New Book: Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Imaging

This second edition of the must-have reference is updated and revised with approximately 30% new content to reflect the numerous instrumental developments and improvements, as well as the significant expansion of this rapidly developing field. With many valuable practical tips.
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iDISCO: 3D Deep-Imaging Advance Likely to Drive New Biological Insights
Nov. 10, 2014

iDISCO: 3D Deep-Imaging Advance Likely to Drive New Biological Insights

In a significant technical advance, a team of neuroscientists at The Rockefeller University has devised a fast, inexpensive imaging method for probing the molecular intricacies of large biological samples in three dimensions, an achievement that could have far reaching implications in a wide array of basic biological investigations. The new method, called iDISCO, optimizes techniques for deep tissue immunolabeling and combines them with recent technological innovations in tissue clearing and light sheet microscopy to achieve unprecedented deep labeling and imaging of molecular structures in the brain, the kidney, and other organs and tissues in experimental settings. A detailed report on iDISCO is published in the journal Cell.
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Super-Resolution Microscopy: Searching for Weapons in the Fight against Drug-Resistant Bacteria
Nov. 07, 2014

Super-Resolution Microscopy: Searching for Weapons in the Fight against Drug-Resistant Bacteria

With the help of super-resolution microscopy, new research at University of Toronto Mississauga could help stop "superbugs" in their tracks. The Milstein Lab is taking a very close look at bacterial cells in hopes of figuring out how to stop the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as CRE or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Dubbed the "nightmare bacteria," CRE infections are immune to even the strongest antibiotics and have the ability to transfer that drug resistance to other bacteria.
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The First Awarding of The Heinrich Rohrer Medals
Nov. 06, 2014

The First Awarding of The Heinrich Rohrer Medals

The Heinrich Rohrer Medal has been established after the name of Dr. Heinrich Rohrer, one of the Laureates of Nobel Prize in Physics in 1988, for recognizing researchers who have made the world-top level achievements in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Dr. Rohrer was one of two inventors of the scanning tunneling microscope, which opened the world to nanotechnology.
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1st Scottish Microscopy Group and Microscopy Society of Ireland Symposium
Nov. 04, 2014

1st Scottish Microscopy Group and Microscopy Society of Ireland Symposium

This meeting will combine the 42nd Symposium of the Scottish Microscopy Group and the 38th Symposium of the Microscopy Society of Ireland. It will take place from November 27-28, 2014 in Glasgow, UK.
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New Control Technique for Scanning Tunnelling Microscopes
Nov. 04, 2014

New Control Technique for Scanning Tunnelling Microscopes

Jülich scientists have developed a new control technique for scanning tunnelling microscopes that enables the user to manipulate large single molecules interactively using their hands. Until now, only simple and inflexibly programmed movements were possible.
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