You are here: Home › News Overview

News Overview

A Clearer Picture of Brain Circuitry with Single-Cell Resolution
May. 28, 2014

A Clearer Picture of Brain Circuitry with Single-Cell Resolution

An efficient method for whole-brain imaging at high-resolution makes it possible to visualize gene expression profiles, circuits and fine neuronal structures throughout the brain. Imaging of an entire brain at the resolution of single cells could lead to a deeper understanding of gene activation patterns and neuronal circuitry during development and disease. Existing whole-brain imaging methods, however, are equipment-, time- and labor-intensive, or tend to destroy the fluorescent labels used to visualize neurons.
more
Atomic Force Microscopy: GaN Nanowires Tips Outperforme Pt Tips in Resolution and Durability
May. 27, 2014

Atomic Force Microscopy: GaN Nanowires Tips Outperforme Pt Tips in Resolution and Durability

In response to requests from the semiconductor industry, a team of PML researchers has demonstrated that atomic force microscope (AFM) probe tips made from its near-perfect gallium nitride nanowires are superior in many respects to standard silicon or platinum tips in measurements of critical importance to microchip fabrication, nanobiotechnology, and other endeavors. more
Live-Cell Microscopy: A New Molecule for High-Resolution Imaging of the Cytoskeleton
May. 27, 2014

Live-Cell Microscopy: A New Molecule for High-Resolution Imaging of the Cytoskeleton

Like our own bodies, cells have their own skeletons called ‘cytoskeletons' and are made of proteins instead of bones. These network-like structures maintain the cell's shape, provide mechanical support, and are involved in critical processes of the cell's lifecycle. The cytoskeleton is an object of intense scientific and medical research, which often requires being able to observe it directly in cells. Ideally, this would involve highly-fluorescent molecules that can bind cytoskeletal proteins with high specificity without being toxic to the cell. Publishing in Nature Methods, EPFL scientists have exploited the properties of a new fluorescent molecule, also developed at EPFL, to generate two powerful probes for the imaging of the cytoskeleton with unprecedented resolution. These probes pave the way for the easier and higher quality imaging of cells, offering many scientific and medical advantages.
more
Light-Field Microscopy: Imaging Entire Brain Activity of Living Animals in 3D
May. 21, 2014

Light-Field Microscopy: Imaging Entire Brain Activity of Living Animals in 3D

Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) and the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) in Vienna, Austria, collaborated with scientists at the MIT to create an imaging system, based on a technology known as light-field imaging, that reveals neural activity throughout the entire nervous system of living animals. This technique, the first that can generate 3D movies of entire brains at the millisecond timescale, could help to discover how neuronal networks process sensory information and generate behavior. The new approach is described in an online publication by the journal Nature Methods.
more
Visualizing a Complex Electronic State
May. 20, 2014

Visualizing a Complex Electronic State

A material called sodium manganese dioxide has shown promise for use in electrodes in rechargeable batteries. Now a team of researchers has produced the first detailed visualization - down to the level of individual atoms - of exactly how the material behaves during charging and discharging, in the process elucidating an exotic molecular state that may help in understanding superconductivity. The new findings are reported this week in the journal Nature Materials.
more
May. 19, 2014

WITec PaperAward for Outstanding Scientific Publications

The winners of this year's WITec PaperAwards have been announced. Research groups from the USA, France, and Germany won the PaperAwards in gold, silver, and bronze, respectively. The annual awards honor outstanding scientific publications that feature results acquired with a WITec instrument. Scientists from all over the world submitted more than 60 publications, from between January and December 2013, to this year's competition. A jury chose the three winning papers from among the submissions to be honored with a PaperAward. Selection criteria included the impact of scientific results and the innovation of the applied techniques.
more
First Low-Energy Focused Ion Beam Microscope that Uses a Lithium Ion Source
May. 16, 2014

First Low-Energy Focused Ion Beam Microscope that Uses a Lithium Ion Source

Microscopes don't exactly lie, but their limitations affect the truths they can tell. For example, scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) simply can't see materials that don't conduct electricity very well, and their high energies can actually damage some types of samples. In an effort to extract a little more truth from the world of nanomaterials and nanostructures, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built the first low-energy focused ion beam (FIB) microscope that uses a lithium ion source.
more
Synchrotron Infrared Nano-Spectroscopy: Studying Complex Systems on the Nanoscale
May. 15, 2014

Synchrotron Infrared Nano-Spectroscopy: Studying Complex Systems on the Nanoscale

For years, scientists have had an itch they couldn't scratch. Even with the best microscopes and spectrometers, it's been difficult to study and identify molecules at the so-called mesoscale, a region of matter that ranges from 10 to 1000 nanometers in size. Now, with the help of broadband infrared light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), researchers have developed a broadband imaging technique (Synchrotron Infrared Nano-Spectroscopy) that looks inside this realm with unprecedented sensitivity and range. The results have been published in PNAS.
more
RSS Newsletter


Follow Imaging & Microscopy on Twitter
.


Imaging & Microscopy Issue 3, 2014 as free epaper or pdf download