Zeiss MultiSEM 505: Revolutionize the Speed of Electron Microscopy

  • Zeiss MultiSEM 505 provides the acquisition speed of 61 parallel electron beams.Zeiss MultiSEM 505 provides the acquisition speed of 61 parallel electron beams.
  • Zeiss MultiSEM 505 provides the acquisition speed of 61 parallel electron beams.
  • MultiSEM 505 uses multiple electron beams (green: illumination path) and detectors in parallel. A finely tuned detection path collects a large yield of secondary electrons (SE) for imaging. In combination with a beamsplitter, the SE signal is directed (red: detection path) to a multi - detector array.
  • Zeiss MultiSEM 505

Zeiss will introduce the world's fastest scanning electron microscope (SEM) to an international audience at this year's Neurosience in Washington, D.C.

With MultiSEM 505, Zeiss is presenting the first SEM with acquisition speed of 61 parallel electron beams and offers an unrivaled capture speed of 1220 megapixels per second at a pixel size of 4 nm. This high acquisition speed is used for imaging neural tissue in brain research where it is now possible to observe much bigger samples than before. Zeiss MultiSEM 505 is designed for continual operation and fitted with the intuitive ZEN Software

MultiSEM 505 uses multiple electron beams (green: illumination path) and detectors in parallel. A finely tuned detection path collects a large yield of secondary electrons (SE) for imaging. In combination with a beamsplitter, the SE signal is directed (red: detection path) to a multi - detector array.

Each beam carries out a synchronized scanning routine at one sample position, resulting in a single tile image. The electron beams are arranged in a hexagonal pattern. The full image is formed by merging all image tiles. A parallel computer setup is used for fast data recording, thus increasing the total imaging speed. Image acquisition and workflow control are fully separated in MultiSEM 505.

The first users of Zeiss MultiSEM 505 are the laboratories of Jeffrey Lichtman, Harvard University in Cambridge, USA, and Winfried Denk, Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany. Both are using microscopy to investigate structure and function of the brain. Their results will help to better understand the causes of illnesses such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, and develop corresponding treatments.

Contact

Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH
Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10
07745 Jena
Germany
Phone: +49 3641 64-0
Telefax: +49 3641 64-2941

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