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Bioactive Surfaces Based on PEG Brushes
Dec. 07, 2009

Bioactive Surfaces Based on PEG Brushes

The control over cell-surface interactions is a highly important issue for biomedical and biotechnology applications. Novel thermoresponsive PEG (Poly(ethylene glycol) surface coatings allow convenient control over the cell adhesion and do not interfere with membrane proteins. Here we benchmark the ability of the surfaces to control cell adhesion and quantify the interfacial interactions via colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). more
Making Light Sound
Nov. 30, 2009

Making Light Sound

Optical interrogation of biological tissues offers great variety of intrinsic probing mechanisms as well as highly specific contrast approaches based on tissue-specific expression of fluorescent proteins and extrinsically administered molecular biomarkers. Yet, most of the important living organisms and tissues remain inaccessible by the current optical imaging techniques due to complications arising from intense light scattering in tissues. more
Open your Eyes: Mites Spin a Line
Nov. 16, 2009

Open your Eyes: Mites Spin a Line

Tetranychus urticae is a phytophagous mite living in group. Every individual produces silk strands and constructs a common web for the colony. In spite of the silk value for T. urticae survival, silk remains poorly studied. We developed a technique to dye the silk on both inert and living substrates. Fluorescent brightener 28 was used to visualize the silk. This technique will help to carry out future studies about the web architecture of T. urticae and other silk-spinning arthropods. Introduction more
Quantitative Electrical Nanometrology
Nov. 09, 2009

Quantitative Electrical Nanometrology

In this paper state of the art electrical nanometrology techniques are reviewed with the focus on semiconducting materials. The basics of scanning capacitance microscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, scanning microwave microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy, and their applicability on various material systems are discussed. Quantitative Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements on semiconductors, namely on a conventional dynamic random-access memory cell and on a cross-sectionally prepared Si epilayer structure, are presented. more
Fluorapatite-Gelatine Nanocomposites
Nov. 04, 2009

Fluorapatite-Gelatine Nanocomposites

Fluorapatite-gelatine nanocomposites serve as model system for mineralization steps of teeth and bone. The biomimetic composites show a hierarchical structural shape development starting from a hexagonal prismatic seed via dumbbell states and ending up with slightly notched spheres. This complex morphogenesis is caused by protein fibrils which are integrated into the nanocomposite superstructure. As evidenced by electron holography an intrinsic electric dipole field is generated by parallel alignment of nanocomposite subunits. more
HAADF and EELS Study of ULK Dielectrics
Nov. 04, 2009

HAADF and EELS Study of ULK Dielectrics

The ITRS requires the integration of dielectric materials with effective dielectric constant (k) lower than 2.8. This is achieved using porous SiOCH. Unfortunately during integration in the devices, damages are introduced in the low-k layer by CMP. The impact of these damages on the microstructure and the electronic properties are studied using HAADF imaging and Valence Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in TEM environment. Results are compared to low-k capped with an etch stop layer.
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Fuel Cell Testing
Nov. 04, 2009

Fuel Cell Testing

Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in the future energy supply, especially polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells could become an integral part in future cars. Reduction of degradation of fuel cell performance while keeping fuel cell cost under control is the key for an introduction into mass markets.
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Catching Enzymes in the Act
Nov. 04, 2009

Catching Enzymes in the Act

Proteins that copy and edit DNA help protect cells from attack by removing viral DNA insertions. They are thought to reach their target sequence by "sliding", "hopping" and "jumping" along DNA strands. Observing this behavior has proved hard, however, due to its speed of action. We discuss a recent research project that used a high-speed camera to observe - for the first time - the sliding and jumping of EcoRV, a restriction enzyme, along DNA molecules.
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