You are here: HomeScience Overview › Archive

Science Archive

M-FISH and QuantiFISH
Nov. 02, 2009

M-FISH and QuantiFISH

Malignant cell growth is acquired by genetic and / or chromosomal instability e. g. gene amplification or deletion, chromosomal polysomy, aneuploidy or translocations. Hence, molecular and cytogenetic analysis has become an essential as well as indispensable complementing tool in routine diagnostics of histological sections. more
Selective Harmonic Optical Microscopy
Nov. 02, 2009

Selective Harmonic Optical Microscopy

SHG is an important contrast mechanism in optical examination for thick biological tissues. Fibrous proteins, such as myosin and collagen, exhibit biophotonic crystal nature and are dominant SHG harmonophores in vertebrates. Local molecule arrangements strongly affect SHG polarization behavior. Here we demonstrate to distinguish myosin-based muscle fibers from intertwined collagenous perimysium through SHG polarization selection, without complicated staining or sample/image processing required. more
Environmental Considerations for Long Term Timelapse Imaging
Dec. 01, 2008

Environmental Considerations for Long Term Timelapse Imaging

Environmental Considerations for Long Term Timelapse Imaging: Many of biology's most interesting questions on the growth, division and apoptosis of living cells can be addressed by microscopic observation using long term timelapse imaging. Live cell imaging experiments pose many challenges, however, not the least of which is keeping cells alive and healthy throughout an experiment. Not only are cells vulnerable to photodamage, but maintaining environmental conditions necessary to keep cells alive on the microscope stage for hours, days or even weeks is far from trivial. more
Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy
Dec. 01, 2008

Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy

Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy: The atomic structure of nanomaterials and the energy needed for their function can be optimised by a fundamental understanding of catalytic behaviour of nanoparticles and of the physical, atomic-level properties of materials for solar cells, fuel cells and light sources. This requires advanced tools that can see down to the individual atoms and sense their chemical environment, show information in three dimensions and allow experiments in situ to follow specific reactions. more
Dec. 01, 2008

Zeolites: Highly Resolving Electron Microscopy & Digital Image Processing

Zeolites: Highly Resolving Electron Microscopy & Digital Image Processing - Hardly anyone knows what they're called. And we use them every day, even though we may not know it. We're talking about zeolites, a group of minerals with extraordinary and outstanding properties. Since being discovered in 1756, zeolites have been a focus of research. There was a real run on them starting in 1920 once it became possible to decode the crystalline structure of natural zeolites. more
Scientific Images
Nov. 01, 2008

Scientific Images

During the last decade microscopy has gone through a series of major improvements. The demand of microscopy technique has increased a lot and has brought the limits in optical resolution of light microscopes, as described by Ernst Abbe, to be extended by new technologies like 4Pi, STED [3], deconvolution and others. Scientists want to resolve small compartments and structures within a cell and but at the same time need to visualize a large field of view to be able to understand the complexity of biological organisms. more
Air Quality Control for Hazardous Bio-Material
Nov. 01, 2008

Air Quality Control for Hazardous Bio-Material

Airborne microorganisms are ubiquitously present in various indoor and outdoor environments. The potential implication of fungal contaminants in bio-aerosols on occupational health is recognized as a problem in several working environments. There is a concern on the exposure of workers to bio-aerosols especially in composting facilities, in agriculture, and in municipal waste treatment. The European Commission has therefore guiding rules protecting employees in the workplace from airborne biological hazards. more
Wide-field CARS-Microscopy
Nov. 01, 2008

Wide-field CARS-Microscopy

Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a branch of nonlinear microscopy that allows chemical imaging of targeted vibrational transitions in unstained samples. A resonantly enhanced blue-shifted CARS signal is generated from NIR or visible light, thus the method is more sensitive than normal Raman microscopy and offers better resolution than IR microscopy. CARS microscopes are mostly set up as confocal scanning microscopes, but wide-field approaches are possible as well.

Brief Introduction to CARS-microscopy
more
RSS Newsletter


Follow Imaging & Microscopy on Twitter
.


Imaging & Microscopy Issue 2, 2014 as free epaper or pdf download