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Pitfalls in the Measurement of FIB Beam Size
Oct. 22, 2012

Pitfalls in the Measurement of FIB Beam Size

Focused ion beam (FIB) systems using heavy ions such as Ga are widely used for machining at the 10 - 100 nm level. In order to be able to perform this function precisely it is necessary to have an accurate estimate of the beam size. The commonly used method to measure FIB size is the rise distance method, well known in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but this is subject to a number of errors that can result in an estimate that is optimistic relative to the true beam size. more
Scanning Ion-Conductance Microscopy
Oct. 15, 2012

Scanning Ion-Conductance Microscopy

We report on the development of a simple heating device integrated into a scanning ion-conductance microscope (SICM) allowing the investigation of the morphology of live cells, maintained at different temperatures. The shape and volume of the cells could then be measured with nanoscale precision. With SICM, the live cells are not typically physically compressed, which can be the case for atomic force micro­scopy (AFM) methods [1]. more
In Situ and Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy
Sep. 27, 2012

In Situ and Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy

In situ and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to investigate the mechanism of material transport during Al-induced layer exchange (ALILE) and crystallization of amorphous Si (a-Si). more
Single Molecule Light Sheet Microscopy
Sep. 20, 2012

Single Molecule Light Sheet Microscopy

All genetic information is stored on DNA safely concealed in the cell nucleus. Here it is copied to messenger RNA molecules, which export the genetic information across the nuclear envelope into the cytoplasm, where it is translated into proteins. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy and minimally invasive labeling strategies make it now possible to observe the dynamics of this process at the single molecule level deep within living tissue. more
Single Molecule Pointillism
Sep. 13, 2012

Single Molecule Pointillism

Single molecule super-resolution imaging enables microscopists to go beyond the resolution limit set by optical diffraction, and to image structures much smaller than the wavelength of the probing light. Using variants of traditional microscopes, it reveals the previously unseeable, with the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the nanoscale structure of biological samples. more
Naphthalocyanine on Au Surfaces - Adsorption and Structural Formation
Sep. 06, 2012

Naphthalocyanine on Au Surfaces - Adsorption and Structural Formation

The formation of metal-free naphthalocyanine (H2Nc) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on reconstructed Au(100) and Au(111) surfaces is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at room temperature. STM images reveal the formation of a striped phase and a densely packed H2Nc structure on both surfaces depending on the molecular coverage. The H2Nc formation is mainly driven by molecule-molecule interactions rather than molecule-substrate interactions. more
Fast-scanning Atomic Force Microscopy
Aug. 29, 2012

Fast-scanning Atomic Force Microscopy

We describe herein the development of a fast-scanning atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with inverted fluorescent microscopy (FM), aiming at the elucidation of dynamic structure-function relationships of biological macromolecules on live cell membrane. Applicability of the system is demonstrated by the correlated AFM-FM imaging of chicken red blood cell (RBC) surfaces. more
Charge Transfer at the Single Molecule Level
Jul. 18, 2012

Charge Transfer at the Single Molecule Level

Since its discovery in the 1980s, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been a powerful tool for exploring the nanoscale due to its capabilities for atomic-resolution imaging, tunneling spectroscopy, and atom/molecule manipulation. These unique capabilities of STM enable studies of problems related to the scaling of conventional information technologies to atomic dimensions, and provide opportunities for studying the fundamental bases of novel paradigms. For example, molecule-based devices are of interest for next-generation technologies due to the easy tunability of organic molecules with relatively simple chemical methodologies. This motivates our STM studies of organic-metal interfaces and metallo-organic complexes at the single molecule level.
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