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live cell imaging

Cryo Electron Tomography: Live Broadcast from Inside the Nerve Cell
Jan. 27, 2015

Cryo Electron Tomography: Live Broadcast from Inside the Nerve Cell

Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's are caused by defect and aggregated proteins accumulating in brain nerve cells that are thereby paralyzed or even killed. In healthy cells this process is prevented by an enzyme complex known as the proteasome, which removes and recycles obsolete and defective proteins. Recently, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried were the first to observe proteasomes at work inside healthy brain cells. "When we saw the proteasomes on our screen, we were immediately aware of the importance of the results", remembers Shoh Asano, first author of the study. The results have now been published in the journal Science.  
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Jan. 21, 2015

University of Guelph: New Spinning Disk Confocal Microscope for Live 3D Cell Imaging

Using a federal grant, some spare parts and a little ingenuity, University of Guelph (Canada) researchers have fashioned a spinning disk confocal microscope to study live cells for health, environmental and food applications. Researchers will use the new microscope for live 3D cell imaging.
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Zeiss LSM 800: A Compact Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope
Jan. 19, 2015

Zeiss LSM 800: A Compact Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

Zeiss has introduced Zeiss LSM 800, a compact confocal laser scanning microscope for high-end confocal imaging. With highly sensitive GaAsP detector technology and fast linear scanning, the system provides high image quality and offers enhanced productivity and throughput, as well as greater flexibility in live cell imaging. more
Label-Free Cell Imaging
Nov. 05, 2014

Label-Free Cell Imaging

The Imaging and Cytometry Laboratory at the University of York [1] provides a facility committed to bringing state of the art technology to researchers with varying levels of expertise. A significant effort is devoted to training scientists in imaging and cytometry techniques to advance their projects. The facility is available to both internal and external users. Staff provides fully assisted technical support for the infrequent user while the facility is an excellent equipment resource for the experienced user.
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Oct. 07, 2014

Lensless Microscopy of Cell Cultures - Video to Figure 1

Video to figure 1: The in vitro cell growth of a fibroblast L-929 culture was recorded every 10 minutes over 7 days in more than 1000pictures and visualized as a time-lapse video (fig. 1). more
Oct. 07, 2014

Lensless Microscopy of Cell Cultures - Video to Figure 5, right

Video to Figure 5, right: With the large cell number inside the field-of-view it is also more likely to observe rare events in the cell culture, such as tripolar cell division of mutated cells. The unusual division was easy to identify in the hologram and was reconstructed for detailed examination (fig. 5 right). more
Oct. 07, 2014

Lensless Microscopy of Cell Cultures - Video to Figure 5, middle

Video to figure 5, middle: The segmented cells can be tracked over the whole experiment time to visualize cell migration, velocity, division rate and the cell lineage [7]. These characteristics are used in chemotaxis assays, for example to analyze cell migration and division in wound healing assays [3]. We visualized the tracks of several cells and noticed that, for instance mother cells, which cover a long distance between cell divisions hand down this attribute to their daughter cells.
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Lensless Microscopy of Cell Cultures
Oct. 07, 2014

Lensless Microscopy of Cell Cultures

The lensless Cell-Microscope combines holographic imaging of cells with a thermoelectric cooling system and automated cell segmentation for live cell imaging inside the incubator. Using holography instead of optical focusing enables to build a cost-efficient, robust and compact microscope. The cooling of the CMOS camera defines the local temperature of the integrated cell culture chamber. Thousands of cells can be imaged, segmented, counted and tracked continuously within the large field of view.
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Live-Cell Microscopy: A New Molecule for High-Resolution Imaging of the Cytoskeleton
May. 27, 2014

Live-Cell Microscopy: A New Molecule for High-Resolution Imaging of the Cytoskeleton

Like our own bodies, cells have their own skeletons called ‘cytoskeletons' and are made of proteins instead of bones. These network-like structures maintain the cell's shape, provide mechanical support, and are involved in critical processes of the cell's lifecycle. The cytoskeleton is an object of intense scientific and medical research, which often requires being able to observe it directly in cells. Ideally, this would involve highly-fluorescent molecules that can bind cytoskeletal proteins with high specificity without being toxic to the cell. Publishing in Nature Methods, EPFL scientists have exploited the properties of a new fluorescent molecule, also developed at EPFL, to generate two powerful probes for the imaging of the cytoskeleton with unprecedented resolution. These probes pave the way for the easier and higher quality imaging of cells, offering many scientific and medical advantages.
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University of Albuquerque Develops High-speed Hyperspectral Microscope
May. 16, 2014

University of Albuquerque Develops High-speed Hyperspectral Microscope

The University of Albuquerque has designed a hyperspectral microscope (HSM) around an Andor iXon 860 high-speed EMCCD detection system to visualize membrane receptor dynamics at the molecular level in living cells.
The HSM provides acquisition rates of 27 fps over a 28 square micrometer field of view with each pixel collecting 128 spectral channels, allowing the determination of stoichiometry and dynamics of small oligomers unmeasurable by any other technique. more
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