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Electron Microscopy: Visualizing Jumping Silicon Atoms in Graphene
Apr. 04, 2013

Electron Microscopy: Visualizing Jumping Silicon Atoms in Graphene

Jumping silicon atoms are the stars of an atomic scale ballet featured in a new Nature Communications study from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ORNL research team documented the atoms' unique behavior by first trapping groups of silicon atoms, known as clusters, in a single-atom-thick sheet of carbon called graphene. The silicon clusters, composed of six atoms, were pinned in place by pores in the graphene sheet, allowing the team to directly image the material with a scanning transmission electron microscope.
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Feb. 21, 2012

Photonics: Development of an Integrated Asymmetric Super-GRIN Lens

Silicon is a unique material that has revolutionized electronics; it enables engineers to put millions of electrical devices onto a single chip. Replacing the electrical currents in this technology with beams of light could enable even faster information processing. Qian Wang at the A*STAR Data Storage Institute and co-workers have now designed a crucial component for such optical chips - a connector that links the silicon chip to an optical fiber. Such a device should enable efficient light input and output.
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Ni-Nanostructures Within Porous Silicon
Nov. 14, 2011

Ni-Nanostructures Within Porous Silicon

A semiconducting/ferromagnetic nanocomposite, consisting of a porosified silicon wafer and deposited Ni-nanostructures, is presented. Porous silicon matrices achieved by anodization of a highly n doped wafer offer oriented pores with an average pore-diameter of 80 nm. Within these pores Ni-nanostructures are deposited resulting in a ferromagnetic system with specific magnetic properties. SEM and TEM investigations are performed to get a correlation between morphology and magnetic behavior.

Introduction
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Growing Nanolasers on Silicon
Feb. 11, 2011

Growing Nanolasers on Silicon

Growing Nanolasers on Silicon: Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have found a way to grow nanolasers directly onto a silicon surface, an achievement that could lead to a new class of faster, more efficient microprocessors, as well as to powerful biochemical sensors that use optoelectronic chips. They describe their work in a paper published Feb. 6 in the online issue of the journal Nature Photonics.
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