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Imaging Ferroelectric Domains
Feb. 07, 2014

Imaging Ferroelectric Domains

When thin films of ferroelectric materials are grown on single-crystal substrates, they can develop regions of aligned polarization - called "domains" - that often adopt complex patterns. Manipulation of ferroelectric domains can lead to advances in a number of technologies. However, in order to manipulate the domains, it is important to study their natural development. Previous studies have shown that interfacial strain and electrical boundary conditions play a large role. Accurate measurements of the local polarization can help science learn more. By changing the properties of the substrate and the interfaces of the ferroelectric materials, one can control the size and shape of the domains and thus influence the behavior of the material.
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Colour X-Ray Camera for the Analysis of Elements
Oct. 22, 2013

Colour X-Ray Camera for the Analysis of Elements

A unique colour X-ray camera went into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR). With this camera, it will be possible for the researchers at the Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology (HIF), a part of the HZDR, to determine within a very short period of time the concentrations of such very finely dispersed metals as rare earth elements in ore minerals. The scientists celebrated the start of the camera's routine operation together with colleagues, partners, and companies who participated in the assembly of the camera. It was developed specifically to meet the institute's analytical requirements.
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The World's Sharpest X-Ray Beam
Oct. 01, 2013

The World's Sharpest X-Ray Beam

The world's sharpest X-ray beam shines at DESY. At the X-ray light source PETRA III, scientists from Göttingen generated a beam with a diameter of barely 5 nanometres - this is ten thousand times thinner than human hair. This fine beam of X-ray light allows focusing on smallest details. The research groups of Professor Tim Salditt from the Institute of X-ray Physics and of Professor Hans-Ulrich Krebs from the Institute of Materials Physics of the University of Göttingen published their work in the research journal Optics Express.
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Materials Research: First Laser-like X-ray Light from a Solid
Aug. 28, 2013

Materials Research: First Laser-like X-ray Light from a Solid

Researchers have for the first time created an X-ray laser based on a solid. The method developed at DESY's free-electron laser FLASH opens up new avenues of investigation in materials research, as reported by the team of Prof. Alexander Föhlisch of the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) in the journal Nature. "This technology makes it possible to analyse sensitive samples that otherwise are quickly destroyed by intense X-ray light," notes co-author Prof. Wilfried Wurth of the University of Hamburg and the Hamburg Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), a collaborative effort by DESY, the Max Planck Society and the University of Hamburg.
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Jun. 13, 2013

Zeiss to Acquire Xradia

Zeiss announced the planned acquisition of the US-based Xradia, Inc. Xradia is an medium-size company providing innovative 3D X-ray microscopes for industrial and academic research applications. The closing of the transaction is subject to the fulfillment of customary closing conditions including a required filing with the U.S. competition authorities. After closing, Xradia, Inc. more
May. 13, 2013

X-ray Free-electron Lasers: Observing the Movement of Electrons around Atoms

X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) produce higher-power laser pulses over a broader range of energies compared with most other x-ray sources. Although the pulse durations currently available are enormously useful for the study of materials, even shorter pulses are needed to observe features such as electrons at subatomic scales. Takashi Tanaka from the Riken SPring-8 Center has now proposed a theoretical pulse-amplification scheme that allows for the production of ultrashort x-ray pulses at extremely high energies.
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New Metrics for X-ray and Neutron Analysis of Flexible Macromolecules
Apr. 30, 2013

New Metrics for X-ray and Neutron Analysis of Flexible Macromolecules

A dramatic leap forward in the ability of scientists to study the structural states of macromolecules such as proteins and nanoparticles in solution has been achieved by a pair of researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The researchers have developed a new set of metrics for analyzing data acquired via small angle scattering (SAS) experiments with X-rays (SAXS) or neutrons (SANS). Among other advantages, this will reduce the time required to collect data by up to 20 times.
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Benchtop X-ray Diffraction Analyzers
Mar. 28, 2012

Benchtop X-ray Diffraction Analyzers

Rigaku Corporation has added MiniFlex 600 and MiniFlex 300 to its MiniFlex series of benchtop X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyzers. 
The 5th generation MiniFlex is a general purpose X-ray diffractometer that can perform qualitative and quantitative analysis of polycrystalline materials.
Key Features of MiniFlex 600
◦ 600 W X-ray Source
◦ Fast Analysis
◦ Improved Overall Throughput
◦ D/teX High Speed detector (Optional) more
Positioning Systems for Vacuum Applications
Feb. 17, 2012

Positioning Systems for Vacuum Applications

PI miCos - Specialist for Precise Positioning Systems in a Vacuum: A wide variety of applications in microscopy or optical measurement technology require a sample or an optical element to be positioned in a vacuum of up to 10-11 hPa. One approach consists of positioners with vacuum stepper motors - from simple linear or rotation units to Hexapods and spacefabs that allow six-axis positioning in the smallest spaces with high accuracies of a few micrometers. more
EMBL Discovers the Stretching of Helices
Feb. 15, 2012

EMBL Discovers the Stretching of Helices

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Hamburg, Germany, have discovered that the elastic part of the protein myomesin can stretch to two and a half times its original length, unfolding in a way that was up to now unknown. more
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