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X-Ray imaging

X-Ray Imaging: Visualizing Structural Damage in Lithium-Ion Batteries
Apr. 15, 2015

X-Ray Imaging: Visualizing Structural Damage in Lithium-Ion Batteries

X-Ray Imaging: Charging lithium-ion batteries too quickly can permanently reduce the battery capacity. Portions of the energy storage structure are thereby destroyed and deactivated. These structural changes have been visualized for the first time by DESY researcher Dr Ulrike Bösenberg along with her team at DESY's X-ray source PETRA III. Their fluorescence studies show that even after only a few charging cycles, damage to the inner structure of the battery material is clearly evident, damage which takes longer to arise during slower charging. The results of the studies will be published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.
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Laboratory Soft X-Ray Microscopy
Apr. 13, 2015

Laboratory Soft X-Ray Microscopy

Soft X-ray microscopy in the water window has the advantage of a high spatial resolution as well as a good contrast and high penetration depth within biological samples. This makes it an ideal tool for the structural analysis of living cells without extensive sample preparation. The laboratory transmission X-ray microscope (LTXM) at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray Technologies (BLiX) has various fields of applications, one of which is the investigation of the penetration of nanoparticles in human skin.
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A New X-Ray Microscope for Nanoscale Imaging
Mar. 02, 2015

A New X-Ray Microscope for Nanoscale Imaging

Delivering the capability to image nanostructures and chemical reactions down to nanometer resolution requires a new class of x-ray microscope that can perform precision microscopy experiments using ultra-bright x-rays from the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This groundbreaking instrument, designed to deliver a suite of unprecedented x-ray imaging capabilities for the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline, brings researchers one step closer to the ultimate goal of nanometer resolution at NSLS-II, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility.
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X-Ray Imaging: Capturing Living Cells with Unprecedented Speed and Resolution
Feb. 12, 2015

X-Ray Imaging: Capturing Living Cells with Unprecedented Speed and Resolution

An international team led by Uppsala University and including scientists from DESY and the European XFEL has for the first time successfully imaged whole living bacterial cells with an X-ray laser. The method used in this experiment can produce results that are of higher spatial and temporal resolution than even the best optical microscopy techniques, with the added possibility of creating detailed 3D models of the cells. "When you really want to understand the details of a cell's functions, you need it alive", says Uppsala University Professor Janos Hajdu, one of the lead researchers in the experiment and an advisor to European XFEL. The technique, as described in the journal Nature Communications, allows scientists a clearer view into the complicated world of the cell.
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The United Kingdom Joins European XFEL
Dec. 24, 2014

The United Kingdom Joins European XFEL

The United Kingdom will become the 12th member state of European XFEL, an international research facility that is currently under construction in the Hamburg area and will start user operation in 2017. The UK Minister for Universities and Science Greg Clark and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) announced that the United Kingdom will invest up to 30 M£ (about 38 M€) to become a full member. The European XFEL will produce extremely bright X-ray flashes that will allow scientists to investigate nanometre-scale structures, fast processes, and extreme states; take three-dimensional pictures of viruses and proteins; and film chemical reactions.
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Filming Chemistry With a High Speed X-Ray Camera
Dec. 12, 2014

Filming Chemistry With a High Speed X-Ray Camera

Chemistry happens all around us. A chemical reaction is a rearrangement of atoms in and between molecules, the breaking of old and the formation of new bonds. The glue that binds atoms in molecules and creates the bonds between them is made out of valence electrons. more
X-Ray Laser Imaging: Visualizing Bacterial Cell Organelles
Nov. 20, 2014

X-Ray Laser Imaging: Visualizing Bacterial Cell Organelles

An international team of scientists led by Uppsala University has developed a high-throughput method of imaging biological particles using an X-ray laser. Images obtained with this method show projections of the carboxysome particle, a delicate and tiny cell organelle of photosynthetic bacteria. Results have been published in in Nature Photonics.
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Developing a New Type of X-Ray Lens
Nov. 13, 2014

Developing a New Type of X-Ray Lens

Researchers have taken an important step towards developing a new X-ray lens made of diamond. A team of scientists from the Technische Universität (TU) Dresden and Technische Universität Chemnitz as well as from DESY have successfully tested a new lens design. The group working with DESY Leading Scientist, Professor Christian Schroer, presents the results in the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters.
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X-Ray Imaging Paves Way for Novel Solar Cell Production
Sep. 25, 2014

X-Ray Imaging Paves Way for Novel Solar Cell Production

The sharp X-ray vision of DESY´s research light source PETRA III paves the way for a new technique to produce cheap, flexible and versatile double solar cells. The method developed by scientists from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in Roskilde can reliably produce efficient tandem plastic solar cells of many metres in length, as a team around senior researcher Jens W. Andreasen reports in the journal Advanced Energy Materials.
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X-Ray Stroboscope Offers New Insights Into Biomolecular Dynamics
Sep. 22, 2014

X-Ray Stroboscope Offers New Insights Into Biomolecular Dynamics

Reaearchers from Göttingen in collaboration with colleagues from Augsburg have 'filmed' the movement of lipid molecules using an X-ray stroboscope at DESY. In the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, researchers lead by Professor Tim Salditt of the University of Göttingen report that their study offers new insights into the dynamics of biomolecules, which compose materials such as cell membranes. The cell membranes consist of a double layer of lipid molecules; the properties of the membranes are of great interest because they control which substances enter and exit a biological cell and also determine which materials are exchanged between different cell regions.
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